Custom mRNA Modification

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Custom mRNA Modification

As a leading biotechnology company in the world, Creative Biolabs offers a full package of custom mRNA modification services to promote the development of mRNA therapeutics. With the help of our highly experienced staff, we can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of custom mRNA both in terms of stability and decreased immunogenicity. Our goal is to provide you with the most affordable, high-quality custom mRNA modification service to ensure your satisfaction in a timely and professional manner.

Importance of Synthetic mRNA Modification

During the past years, the mRNA-based therapy which is founded on the induction of the transient translation with the cell's ribosomes of fully functional proteins without integration into the host genome has become a potential drug for cancer immunotherapy and prophylactic vaccines. Compared with conventional gene therapy and protein substitution strategies, in vitro synthetic (IVT) mRNA has several advantages. However, the molecule's instability and immunogenicity caused by the lack of a cap structure at the 5' end and a long sequence of polyadenylate residue (poly(A) tail) at the 3' end hamper the development of mRNA therapeutics for many years. As the cap structure and the poly(A) tail of the mRNA greatly enhance the stability of natural mRNA, synthetically produced mRNA can also be modified to contain these structures. Using these modifications, the stability of synthetic mRNAs can be improved, immunogenicity can be reduced, and the translation efficiency can be increased.

Schematic structure of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA (mRNA). Modifications of mRNA, such as adding a synthetic cap analog at the 50 -end and a poly(A) tail at the 30 -end, as well as incorporation of modified nucleosides (e.g., 5-methylcytidine or pseudouridine), improve the stability of synthetic mRNAs, increase their translational activity in cells, and reduce their immunogenicity.Fig.1 Schematic structure of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA (mRNA). Modifications of mRNA, such as adding a synthetic cap analog at the 5'-end and a poly(A) tail at the 3'-end, as well as incorporation of modified nucleotides (e.g., 5-methylcytidine or pseudouridine), improve the stability of synthetic mRNAs, increase their translational activity in cells, and reduce their immunogenicity. (Steinle, 2017)

Custom mRNA Modification Services at Creative Biolabs

The application of IVT mRNA is a versatile and promising tool for the delivery of transgenes into desired cells. To promote the development of mRNA-based therapeutics, Creative Biolabs has established an advanced mRNA development platform. With abundant experience and professional scientists, we are capable of both custom mRNA synthesis and custom mRNA modification services for global researchers. Particularly, the modification of mRNA products can be accomplished by either incorporation of modified nucleosides at the 3' end or a cap structure at the 5' end. Our scientists will select the most appropriate modification approach to minimize the risk of mutagen and carcinogen effects of your mRNA product.

Features of Our Services

  • Customized modification options to meet each clients' needs
  • Flexible modification approaches available
  • Professional scientists and technicians with extensive experience
  • Short turn-around time with best after-sale service

Creative Biolabs is dedicated to providing customized mRNA modification services to accelerate the development of mRNA therapeutics. Our services allow researchers to tailor modifications to produce transcripts that are optimal for downstream applications. In addition to mRNA modification, we also provide custom mRNA synthesis and custom delivery vehicle development of mRNA for global researchers. If you are interested in the services we offer, please feel free to contact us for more information.

Reference

  1. Steinle, H.; et al. Concise review: application of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA for cellular engineering and reprogramming: progress and challenges. Stem Cells. 2017, 35(1): pp.68-79.
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